Dienstag, 14. Oktober 2014

Some new papers:

Cognitive ability and epistemic rationality: A study in Nigeria and Germany
Heiner Rindermann, Luisa Falkenhayn, Antonia E.E. Baumeister


Gender Differences in Subjective Well-Being and Their Relationships with Gender Equality
Gerhard Meisenberg, Michael A. Woodley


Using a prison sample to assess the association between the general factor of personality and general intelligence
Curtis S. Dunkel, Dimitri van der Linden, Kevin M. Beaver, Michael A. Woodley


The cognitive ecology of Mexico: Climatic and socio-cultural effects on life history strategies and cognitive abilities
Tomás Cabeza de Baca, Aurelio José Figueredo
Intelligence (Nov-Dec 2014)


Are adoption gains on the g factor? A meta-analysis
Jan te Nijenhuis, Birthe Jongeneel-Grimen, Elijah L. Armstrong
Personality and Individual Differences (Jan 2015)

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Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences - Special Issue about the Behavioral Immune System (Oct 2014)

Freitag, 10. Oktober 2014

Physical attractiveness as a phenotypic marker of health: an assessment using a nationally representative sample of American adults

Physical attractiveness as a phenotypic marker of health: an assessment using a nationally representative sample of American adults
Joseph L. Nedelec, Kevin M. Beaver (Nov 2014)
Evolution & Human Behavior | pdf - via JayMan |


Abstract

Evolutionary explanations regarding the differential preference for particular traits hold that preferences arose due to traits' association with increased potential for reproductive fitness. Assessments of physical attractiveness have been shown to be related to perceived and measured levels of health, an important fitness-related trait. Despite the robust association between physical attractiveness and health observed in the extant literature, a number of theoretical and methodological concerns remain. Specifically, the research in this area possesses a lack of specificity in terms of measures of health, a reliance on artificial social interactions in assessing physical attractiveness, and a relatively infrequent use of non-student samples and leaves unaddressed the confounding effects of raters of attractiveness. Using these concerns as a springboard, the current study employed data from the National Longitudinal Study for Adolescent Health (N ≈ 15,000; aged 25 to 34 years) to assess the relationship between physical attractiveness and various specific and overall measures of health. Logistic and OLS regression models illustrated a robust association between physical attractiveness and various measures of health, controlling for a variety of confounding factors. In sum, the more attractive a respondent was rated, the less likely he or she was to report being diagnosed with a wide range of chronic diseases and neuropsychological disorders. Importantly, this finding was observed for both sexes. These analyses provide further support for physical attractiveness as a phenotypic marker of health. The findings are discussed in reference to evolutionary theory, and the limitations of the study and future research suggestions are also addressed.





The slow and fast life histories of early birds and night owls: Their future- or present-orientation accounts for their sexually monogamous or promiscuous tendencies

The slow and fast life histories of early birds and night owls: Their future- or present-orientation accounts for their sexually monogamous or promiscuous tendencies
Davide Ponzi, Andrea Henry, Konrad Kubicki, Nora Nickels, M. Claire Wilson, Dario Maestripieri (Oct 2014)
Evolution and Human Behavior

Abstract

In this study we tested the hypothesis that inter-individual variation in morningness-eveningness (i.e., chronotype) is associated with variation in a composite measure of life history (the mini-K) such that morning-types (i.e., early birds) exhibit traits typically associated with slow life histories while evening-types (i.e., night owls) exhibit traits typically associated with fast life histories. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that time perspective may be one of the psychological mechanisms mediating the relationship between chronotype and socio-sexuality. Study participants were 95 heterosexual young men, most of whom were university students. Chronotype, life-history traits, socio-sexuality, and time perspective were assessed with well-established self-report measures. Variations in chronotype and in life-history traits were significantly associated in the direction predicted by our hypothesis. Consistent with our second hypothesis, time perspective emerged as a significant mediator of the association between chronotype and socio-sexuality so that the future orientation of morning-types was associated with their long-term mating orientation and relatively low sexual experience, while the present orientation of evening-types was associated with their short-term mating orientation and greater sexual experience. Our study provides the first evidence that variation in chronotype may be adaptive and elucidates one of the psychological mechanisms underlying the life history and reproductive strategies of male early birds and night owls.

James Thompson about the Ebola Virus Epidemic

Ebola expert speaks (Oct 2014)
http://drjamesthompson.blogspot.com.es/2014/10/ebola-expert-speaks.html

Ebola IQ test (Oct 2014)
http://drjamesthompson.blogspot.com.es/2014/10/ebola-iq-test.html

Mittwoch, 8. Oktober 2014

The position of the polar timberline in present-day Europe versus the position of the timberline at the most severe stage of the Würm Ice Age.
















Ice Age conditions in Europe

A: The position of the polar timberline in present-day Europe 
B: The position of the timberline at the most severe stage of the Würm Ice Age. (~22,000 years ago)
C: The limits of glacial debris deposited during the Würm Ice Age.
D: The limits of glacial debris deposited during the Riss and Mindel Ice Age.


Source: http://donsmaps.com/icemaps.html (via JayMan)

Dienstag, 7. Oktober 2014

So Atheism is not a very widespread Phenomenon in the Southern Hemisphere...








Global Nonreligiosity




... and probably will never be a widespread phenomenon there.


Source of the map:
http://www.worldmapper.org/display_religion.php?selected=580#  | via E. Kaufmann

[what I mean by "never": not in the foreseeable future]