Donnerstag, 18. Juni 2015

Understanding the Prevalence of Sexual Dysfunctions in Women: an Evolutionary Perspective

Understanding the Prevalence of Sexual Dysfunctions in Women: an Evolutionary Perspective -> pdf
Menelaos Apostolou (2015)


Abstract

Epidemiological studies indicate that almost one in two women face some kind of sexual dysfunction. Given the importance of sexual functioning for successful reproduction, such a high prevalence is enigmatic. Selection forces should have reduced to a low frequency, or have eliminated completely from the gene pool, any alleles that predispose for sexual dysfunctions. Epidemiological studies indicate that this did not happen, and the present paper attempts to examine the reasons why. Based on anthropological and historical evidence, it is argued that in ancestral societies sexual motivation was a much weaker predictor of successful mating in women, than it is today in post-industrial societies. Accordingly, balancing selection has favored a female type of sexual behavior which is characterized by low sexual motivation. This low level of sexual motivation is not optimal in post-industrial societies where mate choice is not regulated, resulting in women, who have such predispositions, to be classified as suffering from a dysfunction. Predictions are derived from the proposed model, and matched with available evidence.

Das Konstrukt der Intelligenz

Das Konstrukt der Intelligenz
Detlef H. Rost (2015)

Dienstag, 16. Juni 2015

The Illiberal Persecution of Tim Hunt

The Illiberal Persecution of Tim Hunt
Brendan O'Neill | June 13, 2015

[h/t hbd chick!]

How Sexually Dimorphic Are Human Mate Preferences?

How Sexually Dimorphic Are Human Mate Preferences?
Daniel Conroy-Bea, David M. Buss, Michael N. Pham, Todd K. Shackelford (2015)


Abstract

Previous studies on sex-differentiated mate preferences have focused on univariate analyses. However, because mate selection is inherently multidimensional, a multivariate analysis more appropriately measures sex differences in mate preferences. We used the Mahalanobis distance (D) and logistic regression to investigate sex differences in mate preferences with data secured from participants residing in 37 cultures (n = 10,153). Sex differences are large in multivariate terms, yielding an overallD = 2.41, corresponding to overlap between the sexes of just 22.8%. Moreover, knowledge of mate preferences alone affords correct classification of sex with 92.2% accuracy. Finally, pattern-wise sex differences are negatively correlated with gender equality across cultures but are nonetheless cross-culturally robust. Discussion focuses on implications in evaluating the importance and magnitude of sex differences in mate preferences.

[See also: The Distance Between Mars and Venus: Measuring Global Sex Differences in Personality (2012)]